Vectidraco daisymorrisae

The photo at the start of my blog shows me holding a fossil that I found in 2008 when I was 4 years and 7 months old, I found it when I was out on a fossil hunt with my family at Atherfield beach on the Isle of Wight, where I live. I took the fossil to a local fossil expert who then took it to Southampton University for more experts to look at it.

The fossil took a long time to be checked and identified but in 2013 when I was 9 it was officially named and released as a new species. The new pterosaur was named ‘Vectidraco daisymorrisae’, the first part of the name means ‘Isle of Wight dragon, while the species name is named after me. As I discovered the specimen I decided to donated it to The Natural History Museum in London in 2011.

Some of the photos are of  me and my family when we took the fossil up to The Natural History Museum to donate it. Lorna Steel invited us to have a look out the back of the museum to see some of the other pterosaurs they have. She told me that my fossil would be sharing a draw with some of Mary Annings pterosaur fossils, she was a fossil hunter in Victorian times.

After the release of the new find everyone in the world wanted to know about how I had found it, about my collection of fossils and bones and wanted to speak to me about it. I have been on Newsround, The One Show and Canadian news (by Skype video), done loads of radio interviews, been in the newspapers in Britain, India and Hong Kong and children’s  magazine’s in Germany and Britain, spent the day with Barney and crew from Blue Peter and appearing on there as well.

I have also been made the Children’s Ambassador for Visit Isle of Wight and had a part in an advert for the Isle of Wight which was shown on ITV.

Martin Simpson has written a children’s book about how I found the fossil; it has some brilliant illustrations in it the book it is called Daisy and The Isle of Wight Dragon.

Last year was very busy.

Advertisements

Manx Shearwater Skulls

These are some of the Manx Shearwater skulls I found on Skomer Island in Wales. When I got home I had to clean them up by pulling off the feathers that were still left on and then putting them in hot water so I could clean up the skull.

If you look at the photos one of the skulls has thinner sections in it, I think this one is a juvenile bird and the skull hasn’t finished growing.